Vervet Monkey Recovering After Vicious Mishandling in Johannesburg

Vervet Monkey Recovering After Vicious Mishandling in Johannesburg

Maltreated vervet monkey that was saved by the brave SPCA team in Randburg is recovering well at the Johannesburg Wildlife Vet.

A vervet monkey is recovering in the Johannesburg Wildlife Veterinary Hospital after being rushed in by SCPA Randburg staff nearly half-alive in a comatose state. The monkey was given timely medical attention and administered the correct treatment. The morning post-incident, he was even able to eat a few grapes. This vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) was captured and brutally beaten by an angry mob of 200 people. After an anonymous tip about a monkey being brutally beaten, SPCA Randburg rushed to save the blameless animal.

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When the SPCA arrived on the scene, they were confronted by a large group of people holding the bloodied, unconscious vervet monkey with a noose tied around its neck. Bravely, the SPCA staff came to its rescue. Gift, a member of the team, courageously rushed forward and took the monkey from the charged mob amidst the hostile atmosphere. Violence erupted as the monkey was safely deposited inside the vehicle. The mob surrounded the car containing the animal and staff members. They demanded payment for the monkey. The SPCA staff was trapped by the people who had surrounded them in layers upon layers of hostile bodies. Members were being pushed and shoved. This same mob that had brutally tortured the innocent vervet monkey was in no mood to spare anyone. Now the hostility was centred and directed onto the SPCA staff.

The scene turned incredibly violent when angry people began breaking the back of the vehicle's canopy. They broke into the kennel and tried to take the monkey, but Gift managed to save the unconscious animal. Afraid for their lives, the staff managed to negotiate their release and escaped the vicious mob. The Johannesburg Veterinary hospital was contacted, and the monkey was rushed in critical condition to the vet. The vets, nurses and volunteers all worked hard to save the innocent life of this animal subject to such animal cruelty.

The Johannesburg Wildlife Veterinary Hospital treats animals free of charge, and it is through their commendable effort that this monkey was able to receive critical care in a timely manner. He was immediately administered the necessary treatment and was able to regain consciousness after 2 hours. Recent reports indicate that the animal is responding to stimuli and even taking an interest in his surroundings. However, veterinary care is still required to ensure a full speedy recovery.

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When the monkey was brought in, his body temperature was dangerously high, most likely due to extreme exertion (trying to get away from and fighting with his attackers), and it was slowly brought down to normal. Severe hyperthermia can lead to organ failure, stroke and even death if left untreated. He was also treated for pain and placed on oxygen. Though still not out of the woods, things are looking up for the vervet monkey who went through such a traumatic experience.

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Without the admirable efforts of the Johannesburg Wildlife Veterinary Hospital, thousands of animals like the vervet monkey might go untreated and probably lose their lives. Thanks to the combined efforts of SPCA and those that aid in contributing funds to the Johannesburg Wildlife Veterinary Hospital, many animals’ lives are saved. You can also help to make a difference by donating, consequently helping to save the lives of many animals by ensuring they receive critical care when needed.

Ruby Khan
Ruby KhanEnvironmentalist / Freelance Writer
Ruby is a freelance writer for ConservationMag. She has a passion for the environment, conservation and raising awareness for climate change issues. Ruby holds a masters in environmental science.